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5 mars 2013 2 05 /03 /mars /2013 08:19

Des tigres des mangroves Sundarbans présentent une faiblesse anormale au niveau de leurs pattes postérieures. Manque de proies, braconnage excessif, autre(s) facteur(s)? Times of India, ce jour.Voir aussi l'actualisation détaillée du Times of India du 6 Mars.

 

Sunderbans mystery: Tigers getting weaker?
Experts are worried about weak hind legs of tigers in the Sunderbans.

 

5 Mars . KOLKATA: A tigress was captured in the Sunderbans on Monday evening after foresters found some abnormality in its movement.

Confirming the news, Sunderbans Biosphere Reserve director Pradeep Shukla said that the doctors would observe the big cat, caged near Sajnekhali, on Tuesday. Members of National Tiger Conservation Authority's (NTCA) schedule I animal handling committee will also visit the spot.

Sunderbans Tiger Reserve (STR) field director Soumitra Dasgupta said the tigress, aged around four years, has a weak hind portion. "We will be able to confirm the future course of action only on Tuesday after the vets check it properly. It has been kept near Sajnekhali," he said.

In July last year, a tiger was captured in the mangroves with weak hind legs. The tiger, aged around eight years and still undergoing treatment at the zoo, was diagnosed with osteoarthritis. Shukla said that possibility of injuries from the breathing roots cannot be ruled out.

However, experts have always sounded alarm on low prey density and human pressure on the forests as probable reasons behind frequent straying of tigers out of the jungles. A recent study by the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) has pegged very low prey density in Sajnekhali and west range of STR.

"Weak hind legs point to less availability of prey in the forests. Recent cases of deer poaching only bring to front the fact that how low prey density is plaguing the Sunderbans tigers. This may be one of the reasons behind the weak hind portion of the tigers. Possibility of an injury while hunting can't be ruled out either," said an expert.

 

Times of Indi, 6 mars.

SAJNEKHALI (SUNDERBANS): Something is wrong in the Sunderbans. In the dense, mysterious mangroves where few dare to tread, something is sucking the life force out of the magnificent Sunderbans tiger. For the third time in three years, a young tigress has been found tottering on weak hind legs.

The three-year-old tigress caught on Monday near Pirkhali-I island should have been at the peak of her prime. Just stepping into adulthood, you would expect it to be a bundle of sinews with lightning sharp reflexes. But this tigress could not even crawl to the tethered goat offered as bait. While its ideal weight should have been 100kg, the famished tigress weighed a mere 75kg.

If only one such big cat had been found in the Sunderbans, it would be a cause of alarm in itself. But three triggered some sort of a panic. Wildlife officials are desperate to find out what is ailing the tigers - it if is malnutrition or a disease. If it's a disease, experts have to find out how it is communicated because tigers are loners. Is it the environment? That would cause serious concern because the Sunderbans tiger has adapted itself to thrive in the brutal, saline ecosystem.

Of the six tigers captured from the Sunderbans in the last three years for treatment, at least three of them have a weak posterior, say sources. All three are young adults. A tiger, captured last July, was recently diagnosed with osteoarthritis and is being treated at Alipore zoo. A tigress, caught in the forests of Netidhopani in October 2011, is also under treatment at Alipore zoo for weak hind legs. The tigress trapped on Monday night has alarming signs of starvation.

A three-member panel of veterinarians - D N Banerjee from Alipore zoo, Utpalendu Mondal, resident vet of Sunderbans Tiger Reserve (STR), and Gosaba block livestock development officer (BLDO) Bidyut Majhi - are monitoring the tigress. They said it would be kept under observation at the Sajnekhali beat office for five days.

Based on the clinical observation so far, some injections, mostly nerve stimulants, have been prescribed for the tigress, said Banerjee. "It had a weak posterior and its temperature was slightly high. It will be administered two bottles of saline once a day for the next three days. Five to six kg of chicken will be its regular diet for the next five days," he said, adding that decision on blood tests to determine the impact of starvation will be taken next week.

The foresters spotted the tigress on Saturday near the forests of Pirkhali-I and noticed some abnormality in its movement. "On Sunday, we placed a trap cage with a goat as live bait close to the sweet-water pond. But to our dismay, the tigress could not move in spite of getting an easy prey. It finally had a go at the goat on Monday night and we managed to trap it," said a forest department official.

Joydip Kundu, a member of the National Tiger Conservation Authority Schedule-I animal handling committee, visited the spot on Tuesday and said that the tigress might have some internal injuries. "Otherwise how can a big cat, which has just attained adulthood, not even stand properly? It's definitely not in a position to go back to the wild now, and all its treatment should be arranged in the mangroves rather than shifting it to Alipore zoo," he said. Echoing his view, another member of the committee, Anurag Danda, said that they have asked the department to find out a way of getting the animal X-rayed without shifting it to the city zoo.

Wildlife Institute of India's Y V Jhala had earlier called for a study to check whether any disease outbreak was behind the repeated tiger strayings in the Sunderbans. For instance, in 2009-10, there were reports of frequent straying of Siberian tigers into Russian villages and towns. It was later found that the big cats were infected with canine distemper, a viral infection. However, Dr Banerjee said that as of now, the tigress doesn't have any symptoms of canine or feline distemper. "We will definitely run some tests in the days ahead to find out what's ailing the tigress," he added.

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5 mars 2013 2 05 /03 /mars /2013 08:13

UN REAPPRENTISSAGE A LA VIE SAUVAGE BIEN ENGAGEE POUR DEUX ORPHELINES. MAIS LEUR FRERE SYMPATHISE AVEC SA PROIE ... (Times of India, ce jour).

NAGPUR: When forest staff at Bor wildlife sanctuary released a live goat in the enclosure of a full grown male tiger, they hoped the beast would make a quick kill. To their astonishment and dismay, the tiger being raised in captivity decided to make friends with its intended meal.

For two days, the tiger did not kill the goat despite being hungry. Instead it indulged in playful behaviour with it, at one point dumping it in artifical waterhole. The male-named Bhangaram (Talodi)- is one of the three siblings rescued from Gondpipri in Dhaba forest range in Chandrapur in September 2009. The other two are females named Sukhwasi and Ganeshpipri. Their mother had gone missing. The six-month-old cubs were shifted to Bor and kept in a small enclosure-only a few thousand square feet- after two months in November. Forest officials had hoped to train them to survive in the wild so they could be released back in the forest.

The three tigers were being fed beef. In 2011 some live deer were released for them. The tigers have now turned four and their hunting skills were once again being tested by giving them live feed in the form of goat shifting them to a bigger 3.5 hectare enclosure in Pench Tiger Reserve.

Accordingly, since February 13, the two tigresses were given three live goats. The tigresses are aggressive and hunted the goats in the enclosure and consumed it, indicating they could hunt. But male turned out to be unusually docile. On Saturday, the goat was released in its enclosure and it remained unharmed till Monday. Sources said the tiger did not even try to kill it and, instead, played with it.

Forest officials, who did not want to be quoted, confirmed the incident. "We finally shifted the goat to female enclosure on Monday morning. The tigresses quickly made the kill and consumed it," they said. The male tiger that had remained hungry for two days was later given beef to eat.

The Dehradun-based Wildlife Institute of India (WII) has recommended release of the three rescued tigers. Now doubts have been raised whether the male can be released back as it appears to have lost its hunting skills. In June 2012, however, it had hunted a live deer released in its enclosure. Since then, no live feed was given to the tigers.

Veteran conservationist and honorary wildlife warden for Gadchiroli M S Chouhan says when the females were rescued they had killed a dog and it seems they still had some hunting skills. "I fear the male is not fit for release," he stressed. Wildlife biologist from Pune Vidya Athreya said the cubs require a lot of help from their mother to learn how to hunt well.

Earlier, noted tiger experts Valmik Thapar and K Ullas Karanth had cautioned that releasing orphaned tigers back in the wild was full of problems as captive animals were not adept at finding their own food source-they can therefore turn into cattle lifters or man eaters. Karanth said there were very few situations in India warranting release of tigers from captivity. Wherever prey occurs, wild tigers are already found in appropriate densities, so the need for introducing tigers does not exist.

IRRATIONALLY RATIONAL

* The three tigers were brought to Bor in November 2009, but repeated requests chief wildlife wardens to expedite their release fell on deaf ears of NTCA

* Two crucial years were wasted. It was only on October 4, 2011, that a two-member WII team visited Bor, that too after principal secretary (forests) Praveen Pardeshi followed up

* The three tigers have been kept in an enclosure which is just 652 sq metres, within this a small space has been earmarked for the male

* In 2011, the tigers were given deer as live feed. The tigers killed the deer but as live feed was stopped, the situation was back to square one

* Experiments need a super infrastructure. The forest department lacks trained people. After much persuasion, a larger enclosure in Pench was built

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5 mars 2013 2 05 /03 /mars /2013 08:05

ENCORE UN CONFLIT MEURTRIER A SUMATRA (Jakarta Post, hier).

Local residents in some areas in Jambi are on guard after a Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) approached settlements and attacked locals.

“One local is dead and five people sustained injuries after being attacked by the tiger,” said the Jambi-chapter Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA) head Tri Siswo Rahardjo on Monday.

Data from the BKSDA Jambi showed that Sutardi or “Kancil”, a 21-years-old male from Pacitan, East Java, was mauled to death by the tiger in PT Wira Karya Sakti’s (WKS) fifth district in Suban village in Batang Asam district, Tanjungjabung Barat regency, on Jan.24.

On Feb.8, Fajar, 37, an employee at PT Dasa Anugerah Sejati, was attacked by the tiger in Lubuk Bernai village in Batang Asam, Tanjungjabung Barat regency. Luckily, he escaped and only sustained light injuries.

On the same day, Kasdan, 60, a local resident in Tanjung Tayas village in Tungkal Ulu district, Tanjungjabung Barat regency, was chased by the tiger while he was working at a palm oil plantation. The animal tired of chasing Kasdan who stood only five meters away from the tiger. The villager sought help from a nearby security guard post.

Another victim, Legino Murdianto, 22, was attacked at a location that belonged to PT CKT in Dusun Mudo village on Feb.11.

On Feb.28, the same tiger also attacked Sutrisno, 37, a local from Muaro Sebo village in Jambi Luar Kota district, Muaro Jambi regency. He was working on a rubber farm when the tiger suddenly pounced and went for his leg and chest.

On Sunday, the tiger again attacked Wahyudi, 23, who was working on a rubber farm located in the backside of Sungai Landai market in Sri Mulyo village, Tempino sub-district, Mestong district, Muaro Jambi regency.

According to the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), Sumatran tigers are the smallest surviving tiger subspecies and are protected by law as they are critically endangered.

The tiger received an anesthetist-shot from BKSDA rangers on Sunday night. However, the shot was unable to paralyze the 1.5-meter-long tiger, presumed to be male.

“The tiger got an anesthetist shot from our personnel in the field but it could escape,” said Tri Siswo, adding that each anesthetist shot only affects the animal for about 30 minutes. The BKSDA had first tried to trap the tiger but it was unsuccessful, he added.

Data from the BKSDA Jambi shows that the Sumatran tigers in Jambi number only 89 and they are scattered across several locations. Forty three tigers are now living in the Bukit Tiga Puluh National Park (TNBT) located in the Jambi and Riau provinces, TNBT data from 2008 shows.

During the period 2004 to 2010, 22 Sumatran tigers were caught on camera in the Kerinci Seblat National Park (TNKS). It was reported by PT WKS in 2012 that there were 12 tigers in the company’s first, third and sixth districts. Meanwhile in the PT WKS’s germplasm cultivation areas, there were three tigers recorded in 2012.

Six tigers were seen on camera in the Ecosystem Restoration (REKI) area in 2012. According to a 2013 report, two Sumatran tigers are now at the Frankfurt Zoological Society (FZS). (ebf)

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4 mars 2013 1 04 /03 /mars /2013 08:51

Suite aux articles des 30 octobre et 25 janvier dernier.

Le Président Poutine a présenté samedi 2 Mars à la Douma la loi sur les espèces rares en préparation depuis l'automne dernier, qui place de fait, la biodiversité de l'Orient russe parmi les ressources stratégiques du pays.

Voir site présidentiel

http://programmes.putin.kremlin.ru/en/tiger/news/23071

 

Draft law on tightening criminal responsibility for catching and trading of wild animals from Russia’s Red Data Book

 Vladimir Putin submitted to the State Duma draft Federal Law On Amendments to Certain Legislative Acts of the Russian Federation.

 The draft law is designed to increase criminal responsibility for catching and trading, including keeping, transporting and selling of wild animals, including Siberian tigers, leopards, and other rare and endangered species. It also applies to illegal harvesting (catching) of aquatic biological resources listed in the Russian Federation’s Red Data Book or those protected by Russia’s international treaties. The draft law provides that the above will be considered exclusively as criminal offences. It proposes that relevant amendments be made to Russia’s Criminal Code.

The amendments also establish criminal liability for smuggling valuable wildlife and aquatic biological resources, as well as their parts and derivatives, across the customs border of the Customs Union within the Eurasian Economic Community (EurAsEC), as well as across Russia’s state border with Customs Union member states within the EurAsEC.

The draft law also suggests making several amendments to Russia’s Code of Administrative Offences.

 

Voir aussi l'article détaillé sur le site du WWF Russie, ce jour.

http://www.wwf.ru/resources/news/article/10916

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1 mars 2013 5 01 /03 /mars /2013 06:04

CONCERT LONDONIEN GEANT CE JOUR POUR LE TIGRE D'INDE CENTRALE. MANIFESTATION DANS LA STATION DE METRO ST PANCRACE JUSQU'AU 21 MARS (Times of India, ce jour).

Voir aussi la page sur le site St Pancras international :

http://stpancras.com/tigertracks/

LONDON: The fast depleting Royal Bengal tiger has found two very influential friends with powerful voices. In the major concert on March 1, to open the world's largest tiger conservation event, legendary guitarist and songwriter of the iconic rock band Queen Brian May has joined hands with the first lady of West End Kerry Ellis — the voice behind this year's Oscar nominated film Les Miserables — to perform classics and raise funds to save India's majestic cat.

The unique event, kicking off in London on Friday will see the historic St Pancras railway station — heritage building and one of Europe's most famous railway stations , play host to the world's biggest ever save the tiger programme . Interestingly the whole station has been taken over from March 1-21 to host programmes and raise money for the Born Free foundation, to implement targeted tiger conservation initiatives. The event will culminate on March 21 with an exclusive black tie champagne reception and gala dinner to be attended by Britain who's who. Majority of the money raised will go towards financing tiger protection programmes working in and around six tiger reserves in Central India.

May said, "This is part of a lastditch attempt to save these magnificent wild animals. We will pitch ourselves into the Gothic public space in St Pancras International and hopefully make an impact on commuters. Tigers are on the verge of extinction — our grandchildren may never have the chance to see one. This is a real chance to gather support, address the issue, and avoid an imminent tragedy."

With one million visitors a week coming through the station, organizers feel it will give a fantastic platform to build awareness and raise urgently required funds for the plight of the wild tiger. Kerry Ellis said, "I think we all feel desperately sad that we are perilously close to losing these magnificent creatures forever. I think St Pancras International will be rocking on Friday night for the rush hour crowd and we are hoping everyone will get behind us and help save the wild tiger."

Organizer Simon Clinton said, "There are an estimated 3,500 tigers left in the wild. If we do nothing , wild tigers could be extinct within 10 years." The Born Free Foundation who will invest the proceeds in the Satpuda forests of Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra said, "Tiger range throughout India, Indo-China , and Southeast Asia is now 40% smaller than it was in 1951 and today tigers occupy a mere 7% of their historical territory. On the Indian subcontinent, where the largest tiger population persists, only 11% of their original habitat remains in an increasingly fragmented and often degraded state."

It added, "The Satpuda forests offer perhaps the best hope for India's remaining 1,700 wild tigers. Constituting several Tiger Reserves connected by forest corridors , this is the largest viable block of tiger habitat in India."

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28 février 2013 4 28 /02 /février /2013 09:34

DE JEUNES TIGRES BLANCS NES EN OCTOBRE DERNIERS VONT RECEVOIR DES NOMS TAMOULS - INDE DU SUD -). The Hindu, ce jour.

 

Animal keeper Chellaya at Vandalur Zoo. Photo:R.Ragu
The Hindu Animal keeper Chellaya at Vandalur Zoo. Photo:R.Ragu

Chief Minister Jayalalithaa has an unusual task at hand — giving Tamil names to the four white tiger cubs who were born at Vandalur zoo on October 29 last year.

Zoo officials had sent a request to the effect to chief minister’s office, but are yet to get a response.

The nine-year-old Anu, the oldest tigress at the zoo, gave birth to four cubs on October 29, 2012. With the new-borns, the zoo currently has 21 tigers — 13 of them being white tigers. The gestation period of tigers is around 105 days. “Four months have passed since the cubs were born. It is time they are named since wild species, especially big cats respond when called by a name,” said a zoo official.

The idea to give Tamil names to the cubs was mooted by zoo officials in 2010. Instead of names such as Arumugam and Geetha (as the panther and bison at the zoo are called), zoo officials wanted the cubs to be named after ancient Tamil scholars.

When the DMK government was in power, former Chief Minister M. Karunanidhi had named a male and two female white tiger cubs Sembian, Indra and Valli respectively in September 2010. Ms. Jayalalithaa also gave two white tiger cubs and a lion cub the names Rama, Chandra and Veera respectively in 2011. In October 2012, the three female lion cubs at Vandalur zoo were named Kala, Maya and Nila. “It is only mammals that are given names as birds and reptiles do not respond,” said another zoo official.

The practice of addressing animals by names also helps caretakers bond with them. The names are usually given by caretakers or forest rangers. Nevertheless, there are occasions when animals, especially those belonging to endangered species such as white tigers, are given names by the zoo director or senior forest officers. For example, when Anu, the eldest female tigress at the zoo, gave birth to her first cub in March 2009, the then zoo director P.L. Anathaswamy, named one of the two cubs after his daughter, Akansha.

There are also instances of animals being named after their caretakers. The story of how the panther Arumugam got his name is a classic instance. In 2001, the animal had entered the zoo premises from the Vandalur reserve forest and the zoo was closed for more than 45 days to facilitate the search for it. After many attempts, the panther was finally trapped and it was named after the animal keeper, Arumugam, who first noticed the panther in the trap cage. Referring to the advantages of the cubs being named by the Chief Minister, an official said the practice would help create more awareness of the endangered species.

 

PAR AILLEURS : dans l'himalaya Népalais, le recensement des tigres du Parc National de Chitwan a commencé. Celui de 2010 avait estimé les effectifs à 125 individus (21st century tiger, ce jour).

Chitwan National Park in Nepal  has begun its tiger census. Using both pug mark counting and modern technology,  it will take nearly three months for completing the field work. 160 cameras traps have been installed,  more than 24 staff  and a dozen elephants are involved.The Chitwan National Park is home to the largest number of tigers in the Nepal where the tiger census of 2010 recorded 125 tigers in the park.

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27 février 2013 3 27 /02 /février /2013 08:47

Déjà 3 tigres morts empoisonnés découverts ce mois ci en Assam, et un éléphant domestique abattu après qu'il ait tué six personnes (Hindustan Times, ce jour).

Forest guards in north-central Assam's Orang National Park recovered the carcass of an adult Royal Bengal tigress on Tuesday.
It was the third tiger believed to have been poisoned this month by villagers adjoining the 78.81 sq km park, 150 km northeast of Guwahati.

Divisional forest officer Sushil Kumar Daila said the carcass of the 10-year-old tigress was found near the Panchnoi No 2 anti-poaching camp on the eastern edge of the park. "Foul smell in the air led the forest guards to the tigress that died a few days ago," he added.

Jumbo shot after killing 6 in Arunachal
Forest guards in Arunachal Pradesh shot a domesticated male elephant after it trampled six people to death. Those killed were labourers engaged in road construction at Likabali in West Siang district. "The elephant killed four people and damaged some houses on Monday. It killed two persons on Tuesday," said NN Jhasa, principal chief conservator of forest (wildlife), Arunachal Pradesh.

 

Le bilan officiel pour l'année 2012 est très lourd (Times of india, hier).

NEW DELHI: The country lost 197 tigers in the past three years with 2012 recording the highest number of 88 deaths, including 59 due to poaching, the Rajya Sabha was today informed.

In a written reply, environment and forest minister Jayanthi Natarajan provided the figures related to tigers poached and deaths of big cats due to natural and other causes since 2010.

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26 février 2013 2 26 /02 /février /2013 06:40

Un rapport de 32 pages, à la fois très instructif et très riche de documents photographiques, réalisé sous l'égide  de l'Environmental Intelligence Agency et publié ce jour sur le site de l'Agence, met en lumière la stimulation du trafic tous azimuts de produits issus du tigre par les Chinois DEPUIS DEUX DECENNIES, en dépit de l'embargo international de 1993 officiellement respecté par ce pays.

http://www.eia-international.org/hidden-in-plain-sight-chinas-clandestine-tiger-trade

Voir aussi, ci-dessous, l'article de Mongabay.com, suivi  des deux articles du Bangkok Post de ce jour : un commentaire général et la réponse chinoise.

Voir aussi l'article de ce jour de l'Hindustan Times sur la légalisation par la Chine de la vente de vin de tigre - conçu à partir de poudre d'os -, notamment (mais pas seulement) dans ses 200 "fermes" et celui du China Daily sur la légalisation du commerce des peaux et parties du corps du tigre.

Nous attendons un rapport d'une qualité comparable sur le phénomène aux USA... (voir article blog "Tigres américains : les années décisives" du 27 janvier).







Chinese government creating secret demand for tiger trade alleges NGO (warning: graphic images)

Jeremy Hance
mongabay.com
February 26, 2013



Tiger bodies in freezer in Guilin Tiger Bear Farm. Photo by: Belinda Wright/WPSI.
Tiger bodies in freezer in Guilin Tiger Bear Farm. Photo by: Belinda Wright/WPSI.



The number of tigers being captive bred in China for consumption exceed those surviving in the wild—across 13 countries—by over a third, according to a new report by the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA). The report, Hidden in Plain Sight, alleges that while the Chinese government has been taking a tough stance on tiger conservation abroad, at home it has been secretly creating demand for the internationally-banned trade. Few animals in the world have garnered as much conservation attention at the tiger (Panthera tigirs), including an international summit in 2010 that raised hundreds of millions of dollars for the vanishing wild cats.

"The stark contradiction between China's international posture supporting efforts to save the wild tiger and its inward-facing domestic policies which stimulate demand and ultimately drive the poaching of wild tigers represents one of the biggest cons ever perpetrated in the history of tiger conservation," says Debbie Banks, head of the EIA's Tiger Campaign.

In 1993, China banned the use of tiger bone, a popular item in traditional Chinese medicine. However, undercover investigations by EIA found that "tiger bones sourced from captive-bred tigers are not being destroyed, leading to what is likely to be a massive stockpile and consumer assumptions that trade is legal or will soon be legal."


Traditional Chinese 'bone strengthening wine.' Note the tiger shaped bottle. Photo by: EIA.
Traditional Chinese 'bone strengthening wine.' Note the tiger shaped bottle. Photo by: EIA.
However wine made from tiger bones is still being produced and sold in China, and the EIA says that government has even encouraged it through a "secret" notification issued to traders in 2005. Under the notification any tiger farm housing over 500 tigers could produce and sell tiger bone wine; in order to circumvent the 1993 law, tiger bone is simply not listed as an ingredient.

"If you get some special permission, you can sell the tiger bones to assigned medicine-making factories and the products will be directly circulated in hospitals," a trader told the EIA.

Traditional medicine is not the only threat to tigers in China. The EIA reports that tiger skins are being sold commercially and in many cases illegally. While the legal tiger skin trade is meant to be strictly regulated in China, the EIA says the system is "flawed" and provides "a cover for black market activities, including the re-use of permits and falsification of origins," according to the report. The NGO alleges that China's cat skin trade is fueling consumption not just of captive cats, but the poaching of wild ones as well.

"During just several days, EIA investigators were offered three fresh tiger skins, one leopard skin, one snow leopard skin and big cat bones, teeth and claws," the report reads. In 2011 the environmental NGO warned nations that China had re-opened trade in wild cats skins.


Distributing agent, Beilan, claims in this marketing power point presentation available online, that they supply Sanhong's 'Real Tiger Wine' to high ranking officials and private members clubs. Photo by: EIA.
Distributing agent, Beilan, claims in this marketing power point presentation available online, that they supply Sanhong's 'Real Tiger Wine' to high ranking officials and private members clubs. Photo by: EIA.
The EIA argues that China's policies are actively stimulating demand for tiger parts, undermining global efforts to double tiger populations by 2022. Tigers are currently listed as Endangered by the IUCN Red List; experts say only around 3,500 tigers survive in the wild as opposed to some 5,000 in China's 200 tiger farms. One hundred thousand tigers were thought to roam the world in 1900, meaning the population has declined a stunning 96.5 percent in just over a century. While poaching and the tiger trade has helped decimate the big cats, they have also declined due to habitat loss and prey decline.

Banks says China must "vigorously address and terminate this intolerable disconnect between words and deeds which so undermines international efforts to save the tiger."

The EIA calls on China to change its laws to protect tigers, destroy all stockpiles of tiger parts, and let traders know that "the objective is to end all demand and trade."

Banks adds that it's not just foreigners who are calling for these changes, but many Chinese as well.

"A Chinese civil society movement has already appealed for changes to China's wildlife protection laws, and Representatives of the National People's Congress have submitted several proposals in recently years to amend laws and regulations [...] and to end the commercial utilization of species such as bears and tigers," she notes.



Captive tigers in the Xiongsen Bear Tiger Village. Photo by: EIA.
Captive tigers in the Xiongsen Bear Tiger Village. Photo by: EIA.



Tiger skin rug at Xiafeng Taxidermy. Photo by: EIA.
Tiger skin rug at Xiafeng Taxidermy. Photo by: EIA.



Frozen tiger head at Xiafeng Taxidermy. Photo by: EIA.
Frozen tiger head at Xiafeng Taxidermy. Photo by: EIA.
Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/0226-hance-tiger-trade-china.html#AF1KT8C5fiubiPdR.99

 

Bangkok Post 1. China is allowing the sale of captive-bred tiger skins and body parts despite signing up to a UN agreement which calls for such trade to be banned, a London-based environmental lobby group claimed on Tuesday.

Siberian tigers in a zoo in Nanjing, east China's Jiangsu province, February 19, 2013. China is allowing the sale of captive-bred tiger skins and body parts despite signing up to a UN agreement which calls for such trade to be banned, a London-based environmental lobby group has claimed.

The Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) says that its investigation has uncovered evidence of a legalised domestic trade in captive-bred tiger products -- sold as luxury home decor -- which it claims stimulates the poaching of wild cats.

The report also presented evidence that suggests traders are using 'secret' government notifications to legitimise the manufacture of 'tonic' wines made using captive-bred tiger bones, contravening a 1993 Chinese State Council order.

China is signed up to the UN Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) which forbids international commercial trade in tiger parts and derivatives.

The accord also calls for domestic trade prohibitions, the consolidation and destruction of stockpiles of tiger parts and products and assurances that tigers are not bred for trade in their parts and derivatives.

Debbie Banks, Head of EIA's Tiger Campaign, said: "The stark contradiction between China's international posture supporting efforts to save the wild tiger and its inward-facing domestic policies which stimulate demand and ultimately drive the poaching of wild tigers represents one of the biggest cons ever perpetrated in the history of tiger conservation.

"Pro-tiger trade policies are championed by only a handful of officials in a couple of Government departments and it behoves China to vigorously address and terminate this intolerable disconnect between words and deeds which so undermines international efforts to save the tiger."

There are around 5,000 captive tigers in China, 1,500 more than in the wild, according to EIA figures.

"The international community should show support for this national movement calling for an end to policies which stimulate demand, and China must make good on its pledges to the international community and stop cynically stimulating and aiding a trade it has vowed to end," added Banks.

 

Bangkok Post 2.

China defended its record on protecting endangered species Tuesday after an environmental group accused it of allowing the sale of captive-bred tiger skins and body parts.

Two Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) at a zoo in Nanjing, east China's Jiangsu province last week. China defended its record on protecting endangered species Tuesday after an environmental group accused it of allowing the sale of captive-bred tiger skins and body parts.

The London-based NGO The Environmental Investigation Agency said in a report Tuesday that China had a legalised domestic trade in captive-bred tiger products which stimulated the poaching of wild cats.

In Beijing a foreign ministry spokeswoman insisted China had enacted laws and taken other steps to protect endangered species.

"The Chinese government attaches great importance to the protection of endangered wildlife, including tigers," Hua Chunying told a news conference.

The Ministry of Public Security, which is responsible for law enforcement, was not immediately available to comment on the report.

The EIA presented evidence that suggests traders are using "secret" government notifications to legitimise the manufacture of "tonic" wines made using captive-bred tiger bones, contravening a 1993 Chinese State Council order.

China is a signatory to the UN Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) which forbids international commercial trade in tiger parts and derivatives.

The accord also calls for domestic trade prohibitions, the consolidation and destruction of stockpiles of tiger parts and products and assurances that tigers are not bred for trade in their parts and derivatives.

Debbie Banks, the head of EIA's Tiger Campaign, said: "The stark contradiction between China's international posture supporting efforts to save the wild tiger and its inward-facing domestic policies which stimulate demand and ultimately drive the poaching of wild tigers represents one of the biggest cons ever perpetrated in the history of tiger conservation.

"Pro-tiger trade policies are championed by only a handful of officials in a couple of government departments and it behooves China to vigorously address and terminate this intolerable disconnect between words and deeds which so undermines international efforts to save the tiger."

There are around 5,000 captive tigers in China, 1,500 more than in the wild, according to EIA figures.

"The international community should show support for this national movement calling for an end to policies which stimulate demand, and China must make good on its pledges to the international community and stop cynically stimulating and aiding a trade it has vowed to end," added Banks.

 

Hindustan Times : vin de tigre. China has officially allowed dose of tiger body parts - traditionally part of Chinese medicines - through an intoxicant - wine.

Selling of Chinese medicines derived from tiger bones has been banned there but not the "tiger tonic wine". The basic wine is made through traditional method but a tinge of tiger bone, before bottling, has turned out to be its unique selling point. A bottle costs anything between $100 to $800 depending for how tiger bone was in contact with wine.

An investigation by London based non-governmental group, Environment Investigation Agency (EIA) released on Tuesday, has found that tiger bones are soaked in wine and then removed, thereby not leaving any trace of it in the wine. Therefore, the company selling the wine is not entitled to list the tiger body part as one of the ingredients.

This is the catch.

When it comes to selling, mostly at country's 200 tiger farms, where captive bred tiger are kept for tourists, the tiger link proves to the delicacy.

"A government notification allows use of the bones of the captive-bred tigers to justify the manufacture of 'tonic' wines so no action can be taken against manufacturers," said Debbie Banks, head of EIA Tiger Campaign.

China, however, insisted that it has enacted laws and taken other steps to protect the wild cat. PTI quoted Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying to say that the Chinese government attaches great importance to the protection of endangered wildlife, including tigers.

These tiger farms have around 5,000 tigers - highest population of captive bred tigers in the world - and a stockpile of body parts of many dead big-cats, which are regularly audited by the authorities. "These bones are kept back in the stockpile at the time of auditing," Banks said.

China's illegal big cat body part industry is considered biggest incentive for poachers, especially in tiger's biggest home in wild, India, to kill the endangered species for a price ranging between Rs. 10 to Rs. 15 lakh per animal.

Around 60 % of 89 tiger deaths reported from 41 tiger reserves in India in 2012 were poaching related. Many believe that actual poaching could be higher because many a time poachers don't leave trace of the hunted animal behind for the killing to be reported.

Banks believes that the Chinese government's policy for promoting use of tiger skins as home décor and wine was stimulating poaching of wild tigers and other big cats in South Asia. The civil society group wants the Chinese government to destroy the stockpile of tiger body parts to effectively check the illegal wildlife trade.

India and United Kingdom has been seeking a ban on tiger farms in China, which the Communist government has refused to accept saying there was no evidence to link tiger farms with increase in demand for big cat body parts.

 

China Daily. 26 february. China authorizes the sale of skins and parts of body of tigers raised in captivity in spite of an UN Resolution which it ratified and calling to forbid this type of trade, declared on Tuesday the Agency of investigation for the environment ( AIE) based in London.
THE AIE asserted having discovered a legal business of products stemming from tigers bred in captivity, intended for the luxury decoration, which, according to her, is going to encourage the poaching of wild big cats.
The association also noticed that traders use a parallel regulations of the government to legalize "toning" wines elaborated from ossement of tigers bred in captivity, in breach with a decree of the Chinese Council of State of 1993.
China signed the international Convention on endangered species (CITIES)((ESTATES)) which forbids the international trade of products or its by-products, stemming from tigers.


  Et pendant ce temps, un nouveau cas d'électrocution est répertorié en Inde (Hindustan Times, ce jour).

Yet another tiger was electrocuted and killed in the forests of Katni district during the intervening night of Sunday and Monday. This is the fourth incident of tiger death by electrocution since November. In all the previous cases, death occurred because of electrocution. Three out of the four cases since November have taken place in Katni district. In all, 14 tigers have died in Madhya Pradesh since January, 2012. Besides, police in Seoni seized skins of two tigers in September, 2012.

Chief wildlife warden PK Shukla told HT that one person has been arrested in the matter but details would be available only on Tuesday as officials are still camping in the area.

Sources said that on Monday morning, villagers informed the forest department staff that a tiger was lying dead near Machmacha village in Barhi directed and co-produced by Ben Affleck I want to thank our friends in Iran living in terrible circumstances right now.

I want to thank my wife, who I don’t normally associate with Iran.” forest range of Katni district. Forest department staff reached the spot and found the dead tiger.

The electrocuted tiger was identified as male and its age was about four years.

The spot where the tiger was killed is about 40 kms from Tala - the headquarters of Bandhavgarh tiger reserve.

Sources said that poachers had laid a trap using electrical wires to kill wild animals. However, a tiger seemed to have walked into the trap and got killed. The poachers fled from the spot on seeing the dead tiger.

All parts of the tiger’s body that can be sold were found intact. A team of veterinarians reached the spot and conducted a post- mortem examination. It confirmed death because of electrocution.



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26 février 2013 2 26 /02 /février /2013 06:25

Un article détaillé du WWF Russie ce jour sur le suivi à tous niveaux des 7 orphelins sauvés de la famine depuis le début de l'hiver (dernier cas, et l'un des plus dramatiques, hier).

http://www.wwf.ru/resources/news/article/10871

 

Hier, le Phoenix Fund établissait par ailleurs un bilan des "Sad Statistics" sur un an (depuis février 2012).

 

(From February 2012 through February 2013)

February 25th 2012 – a 6-month-old young tigress named Cinderella was found barely alive in Primorye. At the moment, she is kept at the rehabilitation centre and is being prepared for return back to the wild.

March 17th 2012 – a male tiger cub supposedly from the same litter with the tigress Cinderella was found extremely undernourished. Despite all attempts by veterinarians, the animal died. 

April 10th 2012 – Primorsky police searched the home and office of a well-known local businessman, Evgeny Romanov, and found a large number of skins and derivatives of wild animals including 148 bear paws, two Asiatic black bear skins, three brown bear skins, two skins and five tails of Amur tiger,  and five dead sea eagles. 

April 17th 2012 - customs officers in Primorsky Province in Russia’s Far East have arrested a Chinese woman as she attempted to smuggle three Amur tiger paws across the border into China. After an investigation into the origin of the paws, it was found that they were from two different tigers.

April 21st 2012 – a male tiger dubbed Gryazny (Dirty) was found washed ashore dead.

August 24th 2012 - eight Amur tiger skins were seized from a resident of Arseniev town in Primorsky krai.

On December 2-3 and December 6, 2012 three orphaned tiger cubs were found in Yakovlevsky district of Primorye and transported to the rehabilitation centre near Alekseevka village.

On January 10-11, 2013 – a 6-month-old tiger cub was found with a traumatized paw near Svetlogorye village, and now the animal is kept at Utyos Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre in Khabarovsky krai.

January 15th 2013 - police officers discovered an Amur tiger skin illegally transported by train from Vladivostok to Khabarovsk. A train conductor was asked by a stranger to deliver a package to a man in Khabarovsk. During routine inspection, a tiger skin was found in a plastic bag. Experts believe that it was a 1.5-year-old tiger. There was a bullet hole on the skin that indicates that the animal supposedly was killed by poachers.

February 5th 2013 – Primorsky police arrested a women charged with illegal trade of the remains of a tiger cub - a skull, legs and rib cage. 

February 14th 2013 – wildlife managers rescued a 6-month-old female tiger cub caught in a trap in Kavalerovsky district. The animal was extremely emaciated. His leg was seriously traumatized. The cub was transported to Arseniev town where it was urgently operated by veterinarians.

February 17th 2013 - Ussuriisky police officers and wildlife managers arrested two residents charged with killing a 4-year-old Amur tiger. The detained suspects had killed an Amur tiger and then tried to sell its skin, bones and cartilages.

February 21st 2013  - a 6-month-old male tiger cub was found in Kavalerovsky district of Primorye.

February 25th 2013 – a 6-month-old tiger cub was found extremely emaciated 60 km from Svetlogorye village, Pozharsky district of Primorye.

TOTAL: 8 tigers were rescued and 17-20 tigers were lost


Sergei Bereznuk, Director of the Phoenix Fund:
"There are no words to express our indignation. For less than one year this is the eighth tiger cub taken from the wild due to its young age and inexperience to survive on its own. We are almost 100% sure that their mothers died. And they were most probably killed by poachers. If we also add unprecedented seizures of tiger skins and bones by law enforcement officers in Primorye and Khabarovsk, one can say that we have lost a few dozens of Amur tigers in just over 12 months.  And the situation can become irreparable soon because tigers gene pool has become depleted. Our State Duma spent too much time considering Kremlin chief of staff Sergey Ivanov’s initiative to turn capturing, trade and transportation of rare and endangered species into a criminal offence. That is why poachers and wildlife traffickers are trying now to preserve as many tiger skins and bones as possible. While our deputies are dealing with other problems they consider more important than the weakness of environmental laws, the Amur tiger population may become extinct.

For more than two years the Phoenix Fund and Wildlife Conservation Society have been running a project aimed at improving efficiency of anti-poaching efforts with the use of Management Information System (MIST) in four protected areas in Primorye. And during these years no tigers were killed there. It seems likely that tigers are mostly killed outside of the protected areas where Hunting Management Department, a state agency of Primorsky krai administration, must provide efficient protection of these endangered cats. Unfortunately, up to date we could not convince local officials in charge of nature conservation that it is necessary to take measures to improve anti-poaching management by that agency. We are ready to assist them with MIST introduction, consult and train rangers to work with this new useful tool, but high ambitions of local officials hinder the process. We hope that these dismal facts about the loss of tigers outside protected areas will make them think over the necessity to take urgent actions.

At the moment, we are collecting signatures on a petition to speed up the process of criminalizing the possession, transportation and trade of rare and endangered species. "

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23 février 2013 6 23 /02 /février /2013 08:34

L'ETAT DU BENGALE OCCIDENTAL SOUHAITE LA CREATION D'UN REFUGE POUR TIGRES DANS LES SUNDARBANS (Times of India, ce jour).

KOLKATA: The state on Friday said the full-fledged work on the 100-acre plot at Sunderbans' Jharkhali for a tiger rescue centre would start soon as the government has been able to draw some compensation package for the refugees, who are still occupying the plot. make it unnecessary to send them for treatment to the state's lone tiger rescue centre at Khairbari in Jaldapara.

The land for the rescue centre is under the control of the refugee relief and rehabilitation department.

approved a 100-acre plot for setting up a tiger conservation and rescue centre at Jharkhali in the Sunderbans.

An ecotourism park on a 99-acre plot, to be developed on the same island in the mangroves, has also got a green signal of the state cabinet. in Jharkhali will be set up on 99 acre plot.

It is currently seeking clearance from the Central Zoo Authority of India for the second tiger rescue centre at Jharkhali in the Sunderbans and for that the state is seeking clearance of Central Zoos Authority. The centre will treat injured tigers rescued from the Sunderbans and thus bring an end to the practice of sending tigers to Alipore zoo or Khairbari near Jaldapara for treatment. The state also has plans to provide the refugees an alternate dwelling place.

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  • : Le retour du tigre en Europe: le blog d'Alain Sennepin
  • : Les tigres et autres grands félins sauvages ont vécu en Europe pendant la période historique.Leur retour prochain est une nécessité politique et civilisationnelle.
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